thisisnotjamaica

this blog is to call out on the stereotypes of jamiaca/jamaicans

postracialcomments:

The ACLU of Louisiana has come to the defenseof a Rastafarian boy who has been suspended from school and forbidden to return until he cuts his dreadlocks.

The boy was sent home from South Plaquemines High School when classes resumed Aug. 8 because his dreadlocks extended beyond the collar of his shirt, in apparent violation of the school dress code.

After he returned to school the following week with his hair pinned up, school officials told the student his dreadlocks remained in violation.

Rastafarians believeLeviticus 21:5forbids them to cut their hair, and dreadlocks are central to their religious beliefs.

“The wearing of dreadlocks for (the student) is akin to the wearing of a religious icon by another student,” the ACLU said in a letter sent Monday to the Plaquemines Parish School Board.

The student’s mother provided a letter to the school superintendent from the 1st Church of Rastafar I that indicated the boy’s family were members and explained the importance of dreadlocks to their faith.

The superintendent told the teen’s mother that was not sufficient to allow the dreadlocks, and when she asked what documentation would be required, he told the mother he wasn’t a lawyer.

“We would object if the school were to tell a Christian student they could not wear a cross or if it were to permit the wearing of religious icons of one faith and prohibited those of another faith,” the civil rights group said. “In discriminating against (the student’s) religious beliefs, the school is expressing a preference for certain religions, which is unacceptable.”

Although the school has not formally suspended the student, he has missed 10 of the first 11 days of the school year over his dreadlocks.

“The actions of the school and Superintendent (Denis) Rousselle are the equivalent of an unlimited suspension,” the ACLU said.

The ACLU said the school had violated the student’s constitutional rights, as well as Louisiana’s Preservation of Religious Freedom Act.

That 2010 law imposes “strict scrutiny” on any burden of religious liberty, which in this case would force the school district to demonstrate a compelling interest in requiring the student to cut his hair.

“(The student) will be able to prove that his dreadlocks and hair length are a sincerely held religious belief of his Rastafari religion,” the ACLU said. “It is also a method of self-expression, because it communicates to others an important fact about (the student): that he is a Rastafari for whom traditional religious practices are important to him and his family. By refusing to allow him to attend school, the Board is violating (his) statutory and constitutional rights.”

ACLU Letter

Source

married2themoon:

easymyselecta:

NO LIES TOLD.

Pot, meet Kettle.

married2themoon:

easymyselecta:

NO LIES TOLD.

Pot, meet Kettle.

(via global216)

angrypolak:

The concept of “Proper English” is prescriptivist, racist, ethnocentric, classist and ableist as shit

(via worstpal)

fckyeahprettyafricans:

In Ghana we say no

Ghanaian celebs against skin bleaching 

Actress and TV personality, Ama K Abebrese earlier this year, kicked off a campaign to fight against skin bleaching and skin toning. The initiative has now reached its peak with billboards popping up in Accra and Kumasi to send across her message.

With the help of Hamamat, winner of Miss Malaika Ghana 2012, Actress Nana Ama Mcbrown and actress/singer Paulina Oduro, Ama K is taking her spreading her campaign wide and across all media. Her choice of Nana Ama McBrown, and Pauline Oduro, clearly sends the message that the campaign is not against light skin but a message for women in particular to love their skin, no matter the shade or tone!

Ama K posted on her Instagram: “Some of the billboards of ‘Say NO to skin bleaching/skin toning’ campaign are out on the streets of Accra and Kumasi. #Ghana. Have you spotted any of them? Tell us where. #ilovemynaturalskintone”


Hamamat is a former beauty queen and model. She was crowned Miss Malaika Ghana in 2006. She is an advocate to the ‘Say NO to skin bleaching/skin toning’ campaign. Her natural skintone can be described as dark/chocolate and she says ‘I Love my Natural Skintone’. #saynotoskinbleaching


Nana Ama McBrown is a multiple award winning celebrated Ghanaian actress. She is an advocate for the ‘Say NO to skin bleaching/toning campaign. Her natural skintone can be described as caramel. She says; ‘I Love my Natural Skintone’. #saynotoskinbleaching

Paulina Oduro aka ‘Aunty Paulina’ is a singer, actress and TV personality with over 30 years experience in the entertainment industry. She is mixed raced and she is an advocate for the ‘Say No to skin bleaching/skin toning #campaign. Her natural skin tone can be described as caramel and she says ‘I Love my natural skin tone’. #saynotoskinbleaching


‘I Love my Natural Skintone’. Say NO to skin bleaching/skin toning campaign. #saynotoskinbleaching Loving the skin I’m in. Loving my dark skin, embracing the beautiful chocolate hue that God blessed me with. He made no mistakes with my skin. My black is indeed beautiful. Join the campaign and upload your pictures and tag ‘I love my natural skintone’ and share your views, let’s go

(via whitegirlsaintshit)

thebluelip-blondie:

balduncle:

lilcoffee:

fuckyeavanity:

se7en12:

utterpandamonium:

I’m not seeing things, right? That does say NIGGER brown, right??

This isn’t life. It can’t be

omg y’all, I just went on the website and this real!!!!!!

this is real

this is 100% real and it’s still up 

what the hell

(via global216)

babeobaggins:

and it’s not just white people

anti-blackness is embedded in this society so deeply that poc are also influenced and it’s so bad that even some black people themselves are so ready to throw their brothers and sisters under the bus for a nod of white approval 

(via blastortoise-chan)

kingjaffejoffer:

Young and Gay: Jamaica’s Gully Queens

After being forced from shacks, derelict buildings, and their own families, many homeless LGBTI Jamaicans have found refuge in the storm drainage systems of Kingston — known locally as the gully. For trans girls and gay men unable or unwilling to hide their sexuality, the sense of community and relative safety the gully provides acts as a welcome sanctuary, and for many, a hope of change to come.

(via wocinsolidarity)

aintralph:

I wanna thank Jamaica for Jeneil Williams.

(via whitegirlsaintshit)